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Polyphenol, an Extract of Green Tea, Increases Culture Recovery Rates of Isolated Islets From Nonhuman Primate Pancreata and Marginal Grade Human Pancreata

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Abstract:

Investigations indicate that an extract of green tea, polyphenol, can significantly increase the culture survival rate of rat islets without deteriorating their functionality. In this study, we examined the effect of adding polyphenol to islets isolated from human pancreata and nonhuman primate pancreata. Islets were isolated from human pancreata that did not meet criteria for clinical transplantation (n = 6) and from nonhuman primate pancreata (n = 5). The islets were cultured in CMRL-1066 + 10% FCS with the addition of 0, 30, 60, 125, 250, or 500 μg/ml of polyphenol. After 24 or 48 h of culture, islet yield, viability, purity, morphology, and stimulation index was assessed. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were also performed to assess the expression levels of the apoptotic related genes, Bcl-2 and BAX. After 24 h of culture, islet yields were significantly higher in cultures supplemented with 30–250 μg/ml of polyphenol than in cultures without polyphenol. After 48 h of culture, significant differences in islet numbers were observed with polyphenol concentrations of 125 μg/ml (p < 0.01) and 250 μg/ml (p < 0.01). However, no significant differences were noted in islet viability, purity, morphology, and stimulation index at each time point with or without polyphenol. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis of the islets indicated that Bcl-2 levels increased by 2.5-fold and BAX levels decreased by twofold in cultures supplemented with polyphenol. This resulted in BAX/Bcl-2 ratios that were lower in polyphenol-supplemented cultures than with control cultures. Polyphenol increases culture recovery rates by precluding islet apoptosis.

Keywords: Apoptosis; Islet; Polyphenol; Preservation; Recovery rate

Document Type: Review Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/000000004773301825

Affiliations: 1: *Northwest Tissue Center at the Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA 98104 2: ‡Kyoto University, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto, Japan

Publication date: 2004-01-01

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  • Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and its application to human diseases. To ensure high-quality contributions from all areas of transplantation, separate section editors and editorial boards have been established. Articles deal with a wide range of topics including physiological, medical, preclinical, tissue engineering, and device-oriented aspects of transplantation of nervous system, endocrine, growth factor-secreting, bone marrow, epithelial, endothelial, and genetically engineered cells, among others. Basic clinical studies and immunological research papers are also featured. To provide complete coverage of this revolutionary field, Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell transplants. Cell Transplantation is now an Open Access journal starting with volume 18 in 2009, and therefore there will be an inexpensive publication charge, which is dependent on the number of pages, in addition to the charge for color figures. This will allow work to be disseminated to a wider audience and also entitle the corresponding author to a free PDF, as well as prepublication of an unedited version of the manuscript.
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