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Y Chromosome Detection of Three-Dimensional Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Constructs in a Syngeneic Rat Animal Model

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Abstract:

Surgical reconstruction of muscle tissue lost by trauma or tumor ablation is limited by the lack of availability of functional native tissue substitution. Moreover, so far most inherited or acquired muscle diseases are lacking sufficient treatment, because only few alternatives exist to provide functional restoration of lost muscle tissues. Engineering those tissues and transplantation into sites of dysfunction may be an alternative approach and may allow replacement of such damaged or failing skeletal muscle tissues. Techniques attempting reconstruction of some human tissues and organs (tissue engineering) have been introduced into clinical practice recently. One major problem that previous transplantation studies were facing is the ability of detection of transplanted cells after integration. Using the Y chromosome in situ hybridization technique in a syngeneic rat model allows transplantation of cell constructs orthotopically, without manipulation of the cells, with no rejection or immunosuppression being implied, but providing a nondilutable genetic marker to identify transplanted cells. The purpose of our study was to create functional skeletal muscle tissue in vivo using the transplantation of primary myoblasts precultivated within a three-dimensional (3D) fibrin matrix and to determine the fate of the transplanted cells using the Y chromosome detection technique. 3D myoblast cultures were established derived from male donor rats and after 7 days of cultivation we performed an orthotopic transplantation of 3D cell constructs into a created muscle defect within the gracilis muscle of syngeneic female rats. Anti-desmin immunostaining and Y chromosome in situ hybridization indicated the survival and integration of transplanted male myoblasts into the female recipient animal, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this approach in tissue engineering and the research of cell transplantation in general.

Keywords: In situ hybridization; Muscle transplantation; Skeletal muscle; Three-dimensional culture; Tissue engineering; Y chromosome

Document Type: Review Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/000000004772664888

Affiliations: Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Tissue Engineering Laboratory, University of Freiburg Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany

Publication date: January 1, 2004

More about this publication?
  • Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and its application to human diseases. To ensure high-quality contributions from all areas of transplantation, separate section editors and editorial boards have been established. Articles deal with a wide range of topics including physiological, medical, preclinical, tissue engineering, and device-oriented aspects of transplantation of nervous system, endocrine, growth factor-secreting, bone marrow, epithelial, endothelial, and genetically engineered cells, among others. Basic clinical studies and immunological research papers are also featured. To provide complete coverage of this revolutionary field, Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell transplants. Cell Transplantation is now an Open Access journal starting with volume 18 in 2009, and therefore there will be an inexpensive publication charge, which is dependent on the number of pages, in addition to the charge for color figures. This will allow work to be disseminated to a wider audience and also entitle the corresponding author to a free PDF, as well as prepublication of an unedited version of the manuscript.
cog/ct/2004/00000013/00000001/art00006
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