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Surgery of Metastatic Anal Sac Adenocarcinoma in Five Dogs

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Abstract:

Objective

To identify survival and morbidity information after surgery for metastases from apocrine gland anal sac adenocarcinomas (AGACA). Study Design

Retrospective study. Animals

Five dogs with AGACA. Methods

Medical records of dogs that had surgery for treatment of metastatic AGACA between 1993 and 2003 were reviewed. Criteria for inclusion required that dogs had lymphadenectomy, with or without further debulking, as part of their treatment for metastatic AGACA and that the tissue was histologically confirmed as consistent with the primary AGACA. Signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, imaging findings, surgical complications, number of surgeries, survival times, and cause of death were recorded. All dogs had a complete blood count, serum biochemical profile, serum electrolytes, 3-projection thoracic radiographs, abdominal radiographs and/or abdominal ultrasonography, and histologic confirmation of metastatic AGACA invading the regional lymph nodes and caudal abdomen. Results

No surgical complications occurred. Three dogs were euthanatized; median survival, 20.6 months. One dog was alive for 19 months postoperatively. One dog had 5 sequential surgical procedures: 1 iliac lymphadenectomy and 4 debulking procedures of metastatic neoplastic tissue around and dorsal to the iliac vessels extending into the pelvic cavity, and was alive 54 months after initial surgery. Conclusion

Dogs with anal sac adenocarcinoma metastases to the iliac lymph nodes can experience long-term survival after surgical excision of the metastatic lesion. Clinical Relevance

Lymphadenectomy may afford long-term survival to patients with metastatic anal sac adenocarcinoma.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-950X.2006.00137.x

Affiliations: Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

Publication date: April 1, 2006

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