Skip to main content

Free Content Risk factors and consequences of congenital Chagas disease in Yacuiba, south Bolivia

Download Article:

You have access to the full text article on a website external to Ingenta Connect.

Please click here to view this article on Wiley Online Library.

You may be required to register and activate access on Wiley Online Library before you can obtain the full text. If you have any queries please visit Wiley Online Library

Abstract:

Summary Objective  To determine the risk factors of congenital Chagas disease and the consequences of the disease in newborns. Methods  Study of 2712 pregnant women and 2742 newborns in Yacuiba, south Bolivia. Chagas infection was determined serologically in mothers and parasitologically in newborns. Consequences of congenital Chagas disease were assessed clinically. Results  The prevalence of Chagas disease in pregnant women was 42.2%. Congenital transmission was estimated at 6% of infected mothers leading to an incidence rate of 2.6% among newborns. Main risk factors of congenital transmission were mothers’ seropositivity and maternal parasitaemia. Parity was higher in infected than in non-infected mothers, but it was not associated with the risk of congenital transmission. The rate of congenital infection was significantly higher in newborns from multiple pregnancies than in singletons. However, we did not observe statistically significant consequences of Chagas disease in newborns from single pregnancies or among twins. Conclusions  The main risk factors for congenital transmission were infection and parasitaemia of mothers. Consequences of the disease seemed mild in newborns from single pregnancies and perhaps more important in multiple births.

French
Facteurs de risque et conséquences de la maladie de Chagas congénitale à Yacuiba dans le sud de la Bolivie Objectifs: 

Déterminer les facteurs de risque pour la maladie de Chagas congénitale et les conséquences de la maladie chez les nouveau-nés. Méthodes: 

La maladie de Chagas congénitale a étéétudiée à Yacuiba dans le sud de la Bolivie sur 2712 femmes enceintes et 2742 nouveau-nés. L’infection Chagas a été déterminée sérologiquement chez les mères et parasitologiquement chez les nouveau-nés. Les conséquences de la maladie de Chagas congénitale ont étéévaluées médicalement. Résultats: 

La prévalence de la maladie de Chagas chez les femmes enceintes était de 42,2%. La transmission congénitale a été estimée à 6% des mères infectées menant à un taux d’incidence de 2,6% chez les nouveau-nés. Les facteurs de risque principaux pour la transmission congénitale étaient la séropositivité et parasitémie àT. cruzi des mères. La paritéétait plus élevée chez les mères infectées que chez les mères non infectées mais elle n’était pas associée au risque de transmission congénitale. Le taux d’infections congénitales était significativement plus élevé chez les nouveau-nés de grossesses multiples que chez les singletons. Cependant, nous n’avons pas observé de conséquences statistiquement significatives de la maladie de Chagas chez les nouveau-nés de grossesses uniques ou chez les jumeaux. Conclusions: 

Les facteurs de risque principaux pour la transmission congénitale étaient l’infection et la parasitémie des mères. Les conséquences de la maladie semblaient bénignes chez les nouveau-nés de grossesses uniques et peut-être plus importantes chez ceux de naissances multiples.

Keywords: Bolivia; Bolivie; Enfermedad de Chagas congénita; Maladie de Chagas congénitale; congenital Chagas disease; femmes enceintes; mujeres embarazadas; newborns; nouveau-nés; pregnant women; recién nacidos; transmisión vertical; transmission verticale; vertical transmission

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2007.01958.x

Affiliations: 1:  IRD UR010, Team “Mother’s and Child’s Health in Tropical Environments”, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, La Paz, Bolivia 2:  IRD UR010, Team “Mother’s and Child’s Health in Tropical Environments”, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Paris, France 3:  Laboratory of Parasitology, Instituto Nacional de Laboratorios de Salud, Minitry of Health and Sport, La Paz, Bolivia

Publication date: 2007-12-01

  • Access Key
  • Free ContentFree content
  • Partial Free ContentPartial Free content
  • New ContentNew content
  • Open Access ContentOpen access content
  • Partial Open Access ContentPartial Open access content
  • Subscribed ContentSubscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed ContentPartial Subscribed content
  • Free Trial ContentFree trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more