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Free Content Efficacy and effectiveness of the combination of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine and a 3-day course of artesunate for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in a refugee settlement in Zambia

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Abstract:

Summary

In the Maheba Refugee Settlement, in the clinics supported by Médecins Sans Frontières, all children aged up to 5 years with a confirmed diagnosis of uncomplicated falciparum malaria are treated with the combination of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) and artesunate (AS). We compared the treatment's efficacy and effectiveness. Patients were randomized in order to receive the treatment supervised (efficacy) or unsupervised (effectiveness). Therapeutic response was determined after 28 days of follow up. The difference between recrudescence and re-infection was ascertained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We also assessed genetic markers associated to SP resistance (dhfr and dhps). Eighty-five patients received treatment under supervision and 84 received it unsupervised. On day 28, and after PCR adjustment, efficacy was found to be 83.5% (95% CI: 74.1–90.5), and effectiveness 63.4% (95% CI: 52.6–73.3) (P < 0.01). Point mutations on dhfr (108) and dhps (437) were found for 92.0% and 44.2% respectively of the PCR samples analysed. The significant difference in therapeutic response after supervised and unsupervised treatment intake can only be explained by insufficient patient adherence. When implementing new malaria treatment policies, serious investment in ensuring patient adherence is essential to ascertain the effectiveness of the new treatment schedules.

Keywords: Plasmodium falciparum; Zambia; artemisinin-based combination therapy; effectiveness; efficacy; malaria; refugee settlement

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2004.01363.x

Affiliations: 1: Epicentre, Paris, France 2: Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France 3: Central Board of Health, National Malaria Control Centre, Lusaka, Zambia 4: University of Zambia, School of Medicine, Lusaka, Zambia 5: Laboratory of Microbiology, Hospital of Côte de Nacre, Caen, France

Publication date: February 1, 2005

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