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Free Content Barriers to prompt and effective treatment of malaria in northern Sri Lanka

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Abstract:

Summary

BACKGROUND  For the past 18 years, northern Sri Lanka has been affected by armed ethnic conflict. This has had a heavy impact on displacement of civilians, health delivery services, number of health professionals in the area and infrastructure. The north of Sri Lanka has a severe malaria burden, with less than 5% of the national population suffering 34% of reported cases. Health care providers investigated treatment-seeking behaviour and levels of treatment failure believed to be the result of lack of adherence to treatment.

METHODS  Pre- and post-treatment interviews with patients seeking treatment in the outpatient department (OPD) and focus groups.

RESULTS  A total of 271 persons completed interviews: 54.4% sought treatment within 2 days of the onset of symptoms, and 91.9% self-treated with drugs with prior to seeking treatment, mainly with paracetamol. Self-treatment was associated with delaying treatment (RR 3.55, CI 1.23–10.24, P=0.002). In post-treatment interviews, self-reported default was 26.1%. The main reasons for not taking the entire regimen were side-effects (57.6%) and disappearance of symptoms (16.7%). Focus groups indicated some lack of confidence in chloroquine treatment and prophylaxis, and scant enthusiasm for prevention methods.

CONCLUSIONS  A number of factors contribute to a lack of access and a lower quality of care for malaria: lack of medical staff and facilities because of the fighting; lack of confidence in treatment, and perception of malaria as a routine illness. Prevention efforts need to take into account certain beliefs and practices to be successful.

Keywords: conflict; malaria; prevention; treatment access; treatment-seeking behaviour

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-3156.2002.00919.x

Affiliations: 1: Medecins sans Frontieres, Colombo, Sri Lanka, 2: Anti-Malaria Campaign (AMC), Colombo, Sri Lanka

Publication date: 2002-09-01

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