Skip to main content

Free Content Wide distribution of Plasmodium ovale in Myanmar

Download Article:

You have access to the full text article on a website external to Ingenta Connect.

Please click here to view this article on Wiley Online Library.

You may be required to register and activate access on Wiley Online Library before you can obtain the full text. If you have any queries please visit Wiley Online Library

Abstract:

The presence of Plasmodium ovale has never been previously reported in Myanmar. Using blood samples obtained in many villages across the country between 1996 and 2000, molecular diagnosis of Plasmodium species was made with semi- or full-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with species-specific primers, followed by agarose gel electrophoresis to detect amplification products. The presence of P. ovale was also confirmed with the another PCR-based diagnosis, the microtiterplate hybridization (MPH) method using species-specific probes. Both methods target the A type of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of the four human malaria parasites. Plasmodium ovale DNA was amplified in samples from 65 (4.9%) of 1323 PCR-positive patients, with perfect agreement between results obtained by nested PCR and MPH. Only four P. ovale-infected patients had single-species infection; all others were coinfected with P. falciparum, P. vivax and/or P. malariae. Quadruple infections were observed in six subjects. Parasites with typical P. ovale morphology were found in only 19 patients by conventional microscopy of Giemsa-stained thin smears or fluorescence microscopy of acridine orange-stained thin smears. Plasmodium ovale infections were found in villages situated in the southern, central and western regions of Myanmar, suggesting that P. ovale may be widely distributed in this country.

Keywords: Myanmar; PCR diagnosis; Plasmodium ovale; field survey; malaria

Document Type: Original Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-3156.2002.00857.x

Affiliations: 1: Department of International Health, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan, 2: Vector Borne Diseases Control Project, Department of Health, Yangon, Myanmar, 3: Tropical Disease Center, Faculty of Medicine, Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia, 4: JICA-Mahidol University ACIPC Project, Bangkok, Thailand, 5: Department of Medical Zoology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi, Japan

Publication date: March 1, 2002

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more