Knowledge for the good of the individual and society: linking philosophy, disciplinary goals, theory, and practice

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Abstract:

Abstract

Nursing as a profession has a social mandate to contribute to the good of society through knowledge-based practice. Knowledge is built upon theories, and theories, together with their philosophical bases and disciplinary goals, are the guiding frameworks for practice. This article explores a philosophical perspective of nursing's social mandate, the disciplinary goals for the good of the individual and society, and one approach for translating knowledge into practice through the use of a middle-range theory. It is anticipated that the integration of the philosophical perspective and model into nursing practice will strengthen the philosophy, disciplinary goal, theory, and practice links and expand knowledge within the discipline. With the focus on humanization, we propose that nursing knowledge for social good will embrace a synthesis of the individual and the common good. This approach converges vital and agency needs described by Hamilton and the primacy of maintaining the heritage of the good within the human species as outlined by Maritain. Further, by embedding knowledge development in a changing social and health care context, nursing focuses on the goals of clinical reasoning and action. McCubbin and Patterson's Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation was used as an example of a theory that can guide practice at the community and global level. Using the theory-practice link as a foundation, the Double ABCX model provides practising nurses with one approach to meet the needs of individuals and society. The integration of theory into nursing practice provides a guide to achieve nursing's disciplinary goals of promoting health and preventing illness across the globe. When nursing goals are directed at the synthesis of the good of the individual and society, nursing's social and moral mandate may be achieved.

Keywords: Knowledge; discipline; nursing theory; philosophy of nursing; theory-practice

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1466-769X.2009.00423.x

Affiliations: 1: Assistant Professor, Department of Adult and Child Nursing, University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, and 2: Professor and Nurse Theorist, Faculty, Boston College, Boston, MA, USA

Publication date: January 1, 2010

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