If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Evolution of atherogenic diets in South Asian and Italian women after migration to a higher risk region

$48.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Download / Buy Article:

Abstract:

Abstract Background 

To identify differences in the evolution of the diets of South Asian and Italian migrants, a cross-sectional, multiethnic study was undertaken in Glasgow, Scotland. Methods 

Five groups of women aged 20–42 years comprising general population (n = 35), South Asian migrants (n = 35) British-born controls (n = 37), Italian migrants (n = 30) and British-born (n = 38) participated in an interviewer administered structured questionnaire on issues relating to health, diet and food selection. Anthropometric measurements were made and subjects completed a 7-day weighed diet inventory. Results 

Compared with the general population, dietary differences were greatest amongst first generation migrant groups. There were major differences between the two migrant groups. South Asian migrants tended to display a more atherogenic profile (fat 42.4% energy, saturated fat 15.0% energy, vitamin C 5.1 mg per 1000 kJ) than the general population (fat 39.1% energy, saturated fat 13.5% energy, vitamin C 6.8 mg per 1000 kJ), and Italian migrants (fat 35.7% energy, saturated fat 12.1% energy, vitamin C 10.9 mg per 1000 kJ). However, South Asian groups had higher intakes of polyunsaturated fatty acids which may be cardioprotective. Conclusions 

South Asian migrants to Scotland appear to develop adverse dietary elements in the first generation, which are modified in subsequent generations, whereas Italians’ diets remain cardioprotective in the migrant generation but deteriorate in subsequent generations.

Keywords: coronary heart disease; diet; ethnic; fat; migrant

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-277X.2004.00584.x

Affiliations: 1: Centre for Public Health Nutrition Research, Department of Medicine, Ninewells Medical University of Dundee, Dundee, UK 2: MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK 3: Department of Human Nutrition, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK

Publication date: February 1, 2005

Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more