If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Efficacy of an assessment instrument to measure affective and cognitive learning domains of students enrolled in food or nutrition courses

The full text article is temporarily unavailable.

We apologise for the inconvenience. Please try again later.

Download / Buy Article:

Abstract:

The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of using a public domain instrument, the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ), to assess affective and cognitive learning domains among volunteer students (n=44) enrolled in food and nutrition courses. Using SAS and alpha 0.01, significant Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficients were calculated between the MSLQ scale, intrinsic motivation, and the following MSLQ scales: task value (r=0.55), metacognition (r=0.5) and time management (r=0.54). Correlations between task value and metacognition, students' effort, rehearsal or elaboration learning strategies were r=0.48, 0.51, 0.55 and 0.58, respectively. Correlations between students' effort and time management, metacognition and sense of self-efficacy were r=0.71, 0.73 and 0.48, respectively. Significant inverse correlations were identified between students' fear of tests and their sense of self-efficacy (r=-0.50) or the effort expended to master learning (r=-0.40). Multiple regression analysis revealed that a three predictor variable model including metacognition, peer help and seeking help from the instructor explained 51.6% of the variance in scores of the first course exam (F =14.22, P=0.0001). Educators need to consider how cognitive and affective differences in learning processes influence curricular and instructional decisions in human nutrition and dietetics.

Keywords: cognitive and affective assessment; dietetic education; metacognition; motivation and learning strategies

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Winthrop University, Rock Hill, South Carolina, USA 2: The University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA

Publication date: December 1, 1998

Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more