If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Changing practice nurses' management of obesity

The full text article is temporarily unavailable.

We apologise for the inconvenience. Please try again later.

Download / Buy Article:

Abstract:

Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess ways of improving practice nurses' (PNs) management of obesity. Methods: PNs completed a questionnaire concerning their obesity-related beliefs and behaviours, before and 1 month after being randomly allocated to either a `learner-centred' group (who received a leaflet and were invited to attend an interactive seminar), an `expert group' (who received the leaflet), or a control group. At 1 month follow-up, PNs were also asked to give a brief questionnaire to five consecutive patients who they saw for weight loss advice, concerning the content and style of the consultation. After 6 months, PNs and patients were sent a questionnaire about their consultation style and weight loss, respectively.

Results: At baseline the PNs felt confident in giving weight loss advice, but stated that outcomes were poor and that the responsibility for this lay with the patients suggesting a professional-centred approach to management. In terms of the intervention, the two educational packages had no differential effects on PNs' beliefs about obesity. However, PNs in the `learner group' reported spending longer on their consultations and being more patient centred, and their patients were more satisfied with the consultation and reported that they were offered calorie controlled diets the least frequently. In contrast, PNs in the `expert group' reported giving weight loss advice more frequently and being less patient centred, and their patients reported greater confidence in the likelihood of weight loss and reported that they were more likely to be offered traditional weight loss interventions. The packages had no differential effects on patient weight. Conclusion: PNs' management of obesity can be changed. However, being more patient centred may not always be the desired outcome. Perhaps a patient-centred perspective should involve an assessment of whether this approach is best suited to each individual patient.

Keywords: educational packages; obesity; practice nurses

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: Senior Lecturer in Health Psychology, Department of General Practice, UMDS, 5 Lambeth Road, London SE11 6SP, UK.

Publication date: June 1, 1998

Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more