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Utility of Immunoassay in Drug Screening in Skeletal Tissues: Sampling Considerations in Detection of Ketamine Exposure in Femoral Bone and Bone Marrow Following Acute Administration Using ELISA

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Abstract:

Abstract: 

Detection of ketamine exposure in skeletal tissues by automated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD) is described. Rats (n = 18) received 0, 15, 30, or 75 mg/kg ketamine hydrochloride acutely (i.p.), and were euthanized within 15 min or 1 h. Ketamine was extracted from ground femoral bone by methanolic incubation followed by liquid–liquid extraction (LLE), while marrow was homogenized in alkaline solution, and then underwent LLE. Extracts were analyzed by ELISA, and subsequently by GC-ECD following derivatization with trifluoroacetic acid anhydride. The effect of tissue type (i.e., diaphyseal bone vs. epiphyseal bone vs. bone marrow) on the immunoassay response was examined through determination of binary classification test sensitivity (S) and measurement of the relative decrease in absorbance (%DA, drug-positive tissues vs. drug-free controls) in each tissue type. The %DA varied significantly between different tissues examined under a given dose condition, and generally decreased in the order marrow > epiphyseal bone > diaphyseal bone, at all dose levels examined. Measured S values for marrow, epiphyseal bone, and diaphyseal bone were 100%, 77%, and 23%, respectively (75 mg/kg dose). These results suggest that the type of skeletal tissue sampled and position sampled within a given bone (diaphyses vs. epiphyses) are important parameters in drug screening of skeletal tissues.

Keywords: bone; drugs; forensic science; gas chromatography; immunoassay; ketamine; marrow; toxicology

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1556-4029.2008.00866.x

Affiliations: Forensic Toxicology Research Laboratory, Department of Forensic Science, Laurentian University 935 Ramsey Lake Rd. Sudbury, ON, Canada P3E 2C6.

Publication date: November 1, 2008

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