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Long-term effects of maternal cortisol exposure and mild hyperthermia during embryogeny on survival, growth and morphological anomalies in farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar offspring

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With the objective of elucidating potential effects of prenatal stress on ontogeny of the progeny, a long-term experiment was designed where mature farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar females were cortisol-administered 6 days prior to stripping and additionally, fertilized eggs were exposed to mild hyperthermia during incubation. This study is a supplement to a previous paper and demonstrates that maternal cortisol increment caused several durable impacts on offspring survival, growth and morphological abnormalities, and that the most distinct effects were observed in offspring exposed to both augmented prenatal cortisol levels and a subsequent episode of early thermal stress. Moreover, offspring displaying anomalous morphology had reduced fork length and body mass compared to their normal counterparts.
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Keywords: broodstock; cortisol; growth; hyperthermia; malformations; salmon

Document Type: Regular Paper

Affiliations: 1: AKVAFORSK, Institute of Aquaculture Research, N-6600 Sunndalsøra, Norway 2: Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P. O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Ås, Norway

Publication date: 01 February 2007

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