If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Distribution and microhabitats of native and non-native gammarids (Amphipoda, Crustacea) in Brittany, with particular reference to the endangered endemic sub-species Gammarus duebeni celticus

$48.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Download / Buy Article:

Abstract:

Abstract Aim 

To assess temporal changes in gammarid distribution in Brittany and microhabitat-use overlap between the endangered endemic Gammarus duebeni celticus Stock & Pinkster, 1970, the expanding natives G. pulex (Linnaeus, 1758) and Echinogammarus berilloni (Catta, 1878), and the introduced G. tigrinus Sexton, 1939. Location 

Brittany and adjacent regions in western France. Methods 

The spatial and temporal patterns in distribution of gammarids at the scale of Brittany were studied using 351 sites. Longitudinal distributions (from the source to the estuary of the river) and microhabitat-use (substratum type and water velocity) were also considered in selected rivers. Results 

At the regional scale, all species occurred together less often than expected statistically, with significant deviations from expected for G. pulex vs. both G. duebeni celticus and G. tigrinus, and for E. berilloni vs. both G. duebeni celticus and G. tigrinus. However, at the microhabitat scale, E. berilloni occurred significantly more often than expected with the endemic G. duebeni celticus, and this appears to be due to similar substratum and water velocity preferences, although at both the regional and microhabitat scales E. berilloni prefers wider streams than G. duebeni celticus. This study reveals a decline in the endangered G. duebeni celticus since 1970. Main conclusions 

The longitudinal and local distributions of G. duebeni celticus, and the higher-than-expected co-occurrence of the species with G. pulex, suggest that the decline of the endemic species may be due to changes in the environment and/or interference from native G. pulex, which is expanding its range in Brittany. The results are discussed as regards to the consequences for regional biodiversity.

Keywords: Biodiversity; Gammaridae; biogeography; endangered species; freshwater fauna; historical biogeography; species replacement

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2006.01609.x

Affiliations: 1: 11 rue d'Ouessant, 29200 Brest, France 2: Salmon & Freshwater Team, Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk, NR33 0HT, UK 3: UMR CNRS ECOBIO, Université de Rennes1 – Campus Beaulieu, 263 Avenue du Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes cedex, France

Publication date: March 1, 2007

Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more