Processing, Microstructure, and Properties of Laminated Silicon Nitride Stacks

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Abstract:

By lamination of silicon nitride tapes, components with complex geometries can be produced. Unstructured tapes can be laminated by common thermal compression. Structured tapes, however, have to be joined by pressureless processes using e.g. pastes as lamination aids because deformation of the structures would occur. These pastes usually contain a binder for maintaining the mechanical contact between the tapes during processing. To prevent the high mass loss of typical organic binders during burnout, pre-ceramic polymers were used in this work. These ceramic precursors convert partly into an inorganic material during heat treatment with a significant reduced mass loss compared with common organic binders. Thus, the porosity in the interlayer of a laminated stack is strongly decreased, which should be favorable for the mechanical and thermal properties. This work discusses the resulting microstructure, strength, and thermal diffusivity data of stacks laminated with pastes containing various precursor contents. These results are compared with those obtained by samples prepared by compression of green tapes. It is found that except for some large pores, the microstructure of the precursor-derived interlayers is qualitatively the same as in the tape material. For stacks made by both lamination methods, strength measurements reveal that the properties parallel and perpendicular to the layers are different. It is shown that the same strength level can be obtained both by using the pressureless route and by the compression method. Unlike the strength, the thermal conductivity does not change with the direction of measurement.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1551-2916.2005.00512.x

Affiliations: Department for Engineering Ceramics, Institute for Nonmetallic Materials, Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany

Publication date: October 1, 2005

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