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Hydrocolloid Dressings in Skin Grafting for Immobilization and Compression

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND

Successful skin grafting requires immobilization and compression of the graft site. Traditional dressing methods such as tie-over dressings, cast splints, and elastic bandages are bulky in the joint area and can cause abrasion, maceration, and even circulatory insufficiency. OBJECTIVE

To test the effectiveness of a hydrocolloid dressing, which provides a moist wound environment, is flexible and elastic, and adheres well to skin, for securing skin grafts. MATERIALS & METHODS

A case-controlled retrospective study was conducted of 62 patients treated with skin grafts at Myongji Hospital between February 2007 and September 2009. Patients were treated with additive hydrocolloid dressing (n=31) or bolster dressing and splinting (n=31). RESULTS

Treatment duration for the hydrocolloid group was significantly less than for the bolster dressing and splinting group (mean ± standard deviation 8.32 ± 1.82 days vs 13.55 ± 5.30 days, p<.001). No significant differences were observed between the groups with regard to age, sex, or graft size. The hydrocolloid group included one case with complication (stitch abscess), whereas the bolster and splinting group included eight cases with complications of partial skin loss. CONCLUSIONS

Additive hydrocolloid dressing is a stable, effective method of securing skin grafts and is associated with better graft survival as measured by shorter treatment time and lower complication rate.

The authors have indicated no significant interest with commercial supporters.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1524-4725.2011.01879.x

Affiliations: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Goyang, Gyounggi, Republic of Korea

Publication date: 2011-03-01

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