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Treatment of Lower Eyelid Fat Pads Using Phosphatidylcholine: Clinical Trial and Review

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Background.

Injectable phosphatidylcholine, a lecithin-derived phospholipid, has been previously demonstrated to improve the appearance of infraorbital fat pad herniation. Current use internationally has led to a significant interest in this novel substance. Objective.

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of injectable phosphatidylcholine, we conducted an open-label study for the treatment of infraorbital fat pad herniation. Methods.

Patients received 0.4-mL phosphatidylcholine (50 mg/mL) injections within infraorbital fat pads every 2 weeks. Patient and physician grading of fat herniation, side effects, digital photographs, and a follow-up questionnaire was recorded. Results.

Ten of the 13 enrolled patients had three to five treatments. Improvements in fat herniation were reported in 80% and 70% of patients as graded by the physician and patients, respectively. Sixty percent of patients assessed their improvement as equal or greater than 5 points (on a 10-point fat herniation scale); however, the physician judged 40% of patients improving to this degree. Little or no response was seen in three patients. Side effects included burning, erythema, and swelling at the injection site. At follow-up averaging 9 months, 50% of patients reported persistence of benefit, 20% experienced some fading, and 30% were the nonresponders. Conclusions.

Injectable phosphatidylcholine is a novel treatment for infraorbital fat herniation that may benefit some patients who are considering blepharoplasty. Larger studies evaluating long-term safety and efficacy of phosphatidylcholine for cosmetic purposes are warranted.

G. ABLON, MD, AND A. M. ROTUNDA, MD HAVE INDICATED NO SIGNIFICANT INTEREST WITH COMMERCIAL SUPPORTERS.
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Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: West Los Angeles Veteran Administration Medical Center, and 2: Division of Dermatology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

Publication date: 2004-03-01

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