Skip to main content

Free Content All-trans retinoic acid enhances differentiation and influences permeability of intestinal Caco-2 cells under serum-free conditions

Download Article:

You have access to the full text article on a website external to Ingenta Connect.

Please click here to view this article on Wiley Online Library.

You may be required to register and activate access on Wiley Online Library before you can obtain the full text. If you have any queries please visit Wiley Online Library

Abstract:

Vitamin A and retinoids are essential nutrients for the differentiation of epithelia. Vitamin A deficiency is accompanied by an impairment in intestinal integrity. We investigated whether retinoids influence the differentiation and permeability of Caco-2 cells under serum-free culture conditions as a model for the intestinal epithelium. Treatment of the Caco-2 cells with retinoic acids (RA) resulted in an increased specific activity, enhanced mRNA expression, and induction of the 5′-flanking promoter activity of the marker enzyme for the differentiation intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Surprisingly, permeability of the Caco-2 monolayer, as measured by transepithelial electric resistance and [3H]-mannitol flux, was found to be enhanced by RA. Treatment with RA had only a slight effect on the mRNA expression of the tight junction-associated proteins occludin, ZO-1, claudin-1, -3, and -4, but enhanced the expression of claudin-2, which was recently suggested to form a paracellular ion channel. The role of retinoids as potent inducers of epithelial differentiation was confirmed for the Caco-2 cells under serum-free culture conditions and it was concluded that IAP is a target gene of RA. The inverse regulation of the permeability by RA under these serum-free conditions showed that other mechanisms, which are essential to regulate intestinal epithelial integrity with respect to decreased permeability, have to be identified.

Keywords: Caco-2 cells; differentiation; retinoids; serum-free medium; tight junctions

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-169x.2004.00765.x

Affiliations: Institute for Food Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover, Germany

Publication date: December 1, 2004

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Partial Open Access Content
Partial Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more