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Vascular non-endothelial nitric oxide induced by swimming exercise stress in rats

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Summary

1. Herein, we report the effects of acute or chronic forced swimming on vascular responsiveness to angiotensin (Ang) II.

2. The possible involvement of locally produced substances, such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostanoids, in these effects were studied in rat thoracic aorta and superior mesenteric arteries.

3. Chronic, but not acute, swimming reduced the efficacy (maximal effect; Emax) of AngII in thoracic aorta and mesenteric arteries, either with intact or denuded endothelium.

4. The efficacy of AngII was reduced in the presence of indomethacin in mesenteric arteries, but not in the aorta, from either control or chronically stressed rats.

5. Treatment with NG-monomethyl-l-arginine reversed the effect of chronic stress on the response to AngII, suggesting that chronic stress may increase non-endothelial NO activity in both the aorta and mesenteric arteries.

6. The effects of acute and chronic stress on vascular reactivity were selective for AngII because no changes were observed on the effects of phenylephrine.
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Keywords: angiotensin II; artery; endothelium; nitric oxide; prostanoids; stress

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine of Marília, Departments of 2: Pharmacology and 3: Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto and 4: Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil

Publication date: 01 December 2003

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