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Effect of aerobic training on 99mTc-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (99mTc-sestamibi) uptake by myocardium and skeletal muscle: implication for noninvasive assessment of muscle metabolic profile

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Abstract:

Abstract Aim: 

The effect of long-term endurance training on skeletal muscle and myocardial uptake of 99mTc-sestamibi, a radiopharmaceutical accumulating in the mitochondria, was investigated. Methods: 

Twenty-six Wistar rats were divided into a trained (5 days week−1 endurance running for 14 weeks) and an untrained group. On completion of training, 99mTc-sestamibi was administered and, 2 h post-injection, the myocardium and the soleus, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles were removed for the measurement of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) activity and 99mTc-sestamibi uptake. Tissue 99mTc-sestamibi kinetics was preliminarily studied in 16 other rats for up to 2 h post-injection. Results: 

Two hours post-injection 99mTc-sestamibi uptake was either stable (myocardium) or still rising (skeletal muscles). Both CCO activity and 99mTc-sestamibi uptake decreased in the same order (myocardium, soleus, EDL, MG) in the tissues examined. The CCO activity of the EDL and MG muscles was higher (P <0.05) in the trained compared to the untrained group. 99mTc-sestamibi uptake in the soleus and EDL muscles was higher (P <0.05) in the trained compared to the untrained rats, whereas the difference in MG was marginally significant (P =0.06) in favour of the trained group. Conclusions: 

Long-term endurance training, resulting in elevated skeletal muscle CCO activity, is also associated with a similar increase in 99mTc-sestamibi uptake. This finding suggests that 99mTc-sestamibi could be used in imaging assessment of skeletal muscle metabolism with possible applications in both clinical and sports medicine settings.

Keywords: 99mTc-sestamibi; CCO; mitochondria; muscle metabolism; training

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-1716.2007.01825.x

Affiliations: 1:  Laboratory of Physiology, Department of Physical Education and Sports Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece 2:  Hippokration Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece 3:  Laboratory of Sport Hygiene and Nutrition, Department of Physical Education and Sports Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece

Publication date: June 1, 2008

bsc/aps/2008/00000193/00000002/art00009
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