If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Effects of progression to cigarette smoking on depressed mood in adolescents: evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health

$48.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Download / Buy Article:

Abstract:

ABSTRACT Aims 

To investigate the relationship between smoking status and continuously distributed depressed mood among a cohort of adolescents. Design 

Quasi-experimental design, selecting the subset of adolescents who reported never having smoked a cigarette at baseline, some of whom progressed subsequently to smoking at follow-up approximately 1 year later. Setting 

Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, an ongoing study designed to assess the health status of adolescents, and explore the causes of adolescent health-related behaviours. Participants 

Nationally representative sample of adolescents from the USA (n = 12 149), including a subsample who reported never having smoked a cigarette at baseline (n = 5475), aged on average 15 years at baseline and of predominantly European ancestry. Measurements 

Logistic and linear regression models controlling for potential confounders to explore the relationship between smoking status and depressed mood measured using the Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Findings 

Various relationships between smoking status and depressed mood were observed, with a general trend for these effects to be greater among females. Smoking status at baseline did not significantly predict CES-D score at follow-up, although this effect approached significance in females (P = 0.077). Among never smokers at baseline, level of depressed mood at baseline predicted subsequent progression to smoking initiation (P = 0.022) but not progression to regular smoking (P = 0.229). Among never smokers at baseline, progression to smoking initiation during the follow-up period was associated with higher CES-D scores at follow-up, even after adjusting for baseline depressed mood (P < 0.001), with this effect greater for females than for males. Among those who initiated smoking, progression to regular smoking was associated with higher CES-D score at follow-up among females (P = 0.001), but not males (P = 0.966). Conclusions 

These data appear to support a complex model of the relationship between depressed mood and smoking status which includes elements of both confounding and causal models. The relationship between cigarette smoking and depression may be a factor in the development of subsequent dependence.

Keywords: Adolescence; depression; longitudinal; mood; smoking

Document Type: Research Report

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2007.02052.x

Affiliations: 1: Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital and Brown Medical School, Providence, RI, USA, 2: Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Butler Hospital and Brown Medical School, Providence, RI, USA and 3: Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

Publication date: January 1, 2008

Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more