Skip to main content

Reducing substance use improves adolescents’ school attendance

Buy Article:

$43.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

ABSTRACT Aims 

Substance use initiation and frequency are associated with reduced educational attainments among adolescents. We examined if decreases in substance use substantially improve youths’ school attendance. Design 

A total of 1084 US adolescents followed quarterly forĀ 1 year after entering substance abuse treatment. Methods 

Random and fixed effects regression models were used to differentiate the lagged effects of drug use from other time-varying and time-invariant covariates. Self-reports of alcohol, marijuana, stimulants, sedatives, hallucinogens and other drug use were used to predict subsequent school attendance, after controlling for demographic and drug use history characteristics, problem indices and other covariates. Findings 

Reductions in the frequency of alcohol, stimulants and other drug use and the elimination of marijuana use were each associated independently with increased likelihoods of school attendance. Conclusions 

Because years of completed schooling is highly correlated with long-term social and economic outcomes, the possibility that reductions in substance use may improve school attendance has significant implications for the cost-effectiveness of substance abuse treatment and other interventions designed to reduce adolescents’ substance use.
No References
No Citations
No Supplementary Data
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: Adolescent alcohol and drug use; school performance; substance abuse; substance abuse treatment

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 2006-12-01

  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more