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One-year follow-up of opiate injectors treated with oral methadone in a GP-centred programme

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Abstract:

Aims. To examine changes in drug-related behaviour in opiate-dependent injectors treated with oral methadone, in a shared care scheme where consumption of the daily dose is usually supervised by a community pharmacist. Design. One-year cohort study. Setting. Recruitment from the main routes into methadone prescribing in Glasgow during 1996: General Practitioner Drug Misuse Clinic Scheme and the Drug Problem Service. Participants. Current opiate injectors entering methadone treatment. Findings. Among the 204 injectors recruited, 148 (73%) were re-interviewed at 6 months and 118 (58%) at both 6 and 12 months. Twenty-nine per cent of the cohort remained continuously on methadone for 12 months. In that group, over the 12-month period, self-reported daily opiate injecting reduced from 78% to 2%; overdose in the previous 6 months from 24% to 2%; mean daily drug spend from £50 to £4; and mean monthly number of acquisitive crimes reduced from 13 to three. Assuming participants lost to follow-up were unchanged, significant improvements in the total cohort were seen in daily opiate injecting (from 80% at recruitment to 43% at 12 months), overdose (from 27% to 15%), mean daily drug spend (from £63 to £38) and mean monthly number of acquisitive crimes (from 18 to 11). Discontinuation of treatment was mainly due to imprisonment (39%) or sanctions by the prescriber (33%). Conclusion. Treatment of opiate-dependent drug injectors with methadone in a community-wide general practitioner-centred scheme, with supervised daily consumption, was associated with major beneficial change for a substantial proportion of patients.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1360-0443.2000.95710557.x

Affiliations: 1: Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health, Glasgow 2: Addictions, Mental and Sexual Health Team, Greater Glasgow Health Board 3: School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Dundee, Glasgow

Publication date: July 1, 2000

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