Skip to main content

Paul Tillich's Realistic Stance Toward the Vital Trends of Nature

Buy Article:

$48.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

Many scientists have argued forcefully for the pointlessness of nature, something that challenges any doctrine of Creation. However, apparent design and comprehensibility are also to be found in nature; it is ambivalent. This trait is nowhere more evident than in the natural inclinations that lead to concupiscence and the “seven deadly sins” in human beings. These inclinations are dealt with as pertaining to the “pre-fallen” condition of nature and human beings. As a framework to make sense of the goodness of creation in this context, Paul Tillich's notion of the “vital trends of nature” is called to the fore. Being at the intersection of a philosophy of religion and a philosophy of nature, this notion hints at the goodness of Creation in fragment and anticipation.

Keywords: PaulTillich; ambivalence; creation; design; evil; goodness; life; nature; pointlessness; seven deadly sins

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/0591-2385.00362

Affiliations: Pontifical Catholic University of Sao Paulo

Publication date: June 1, 2001

bpl/zygo/2001/00000036/00000002/art00014
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more