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Temporal Passage and Kant’s Second Analogy

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In this essay I address the question of the reality of temporal passage through a discussion of some of the implications of Kant’s reasoning concerning the necessary conditions of objective judgement. Some theorists have claimed that the attribution of non-relational temporal properties to objects and events represents a conceptual confusion, or ‘category mistake’. By means of an examination of Kant’s Second Analogy, and a comparison between that argument and Cassam’s recent exploration of an argument regarding the necessity of the conceptualisation of ourselves as spatially located, I draw out a consequence of Kant’s argument: namely, that the representation of temporal becoming is a necessary condition of objective judgement and an a priori element in the representation of objects of experience. I finish by explaining why this would show that the attribution of temporal becoming to objects and events cannot be described as a category mistake.

Document Type: Research Article


Affiliations: University of Massachusetts Commonwealth College, USA

Publication date: June 1, 2002

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