What You Know When You Know an Answer to a Question

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Abstract:

Abstract

A significant argument for the claim that knowing-wh is knowing-that, implicit in much of the literature, including Stanley and Williamson (2001), is spelt out and challenged. The argument includes the assumption that a subject's state of knowing-wh is constituted by their involvement in a relation with an answer to a question. And it involves the assumption that answers to questions are propositions or facts. One of Lawrence Powers’ counterexamples to the conjunction of these two assumptions is developed, responses to it are rebutted, and the possibility of rejecting the second rather than the first of these assumptions is explored briefly.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0068.2010.00745.x

Affiliations: University College Dublin

Publication date: June 1, 2010

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