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Religion and Attitudes Toward Physician-Assisted Suicide and Terminal Palliative Care

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Abstract:

We assess religious differences in attitudes toward physician-assisted suicide and terminal palliative care, and go further than previous research by attempting to explain these variations. Using data from the 1998 General Social Survey, we fit OLS regression models to estimate the main effects of religious affiliation and indirect effects via religious involvement (church attendance and strength of affiliation). Both conservative and moderate Protestants are generally less accepting of physician-assisted suicide and terminal palliative care than nonaffiliates. However, both relationships are at least partially explained by church attendance and/or strength of affiliation.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-5906.2005.00266.x

Affiliations: 1: Amy Burdette is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology, The University of Texas, 1 University Station A1700, Austin, TX 78712-0118., Email: burdamy@prc.utexas.edu 2: Terrence Hill is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology, The University of Texas, Austin. 3: Benjamin Moulton is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology, The University of Texas, Austin.

Publication date: March 1, 2005

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