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Patterns and Personality Correlates of Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Toward Christians and Muslims

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Abstract:

We explored implicit and explicit attitudes toward Muslims and Christians within a predominantly Christian sample in the United States. Implicit attitudes were assessed with the Implicit Association Test (IAT), a computer program that recorded reaction times as participants categorized names (of Christians and Muslims) and adjectives (pleasant or unpleasant). Participants also completed self-report measures of attitudes toward Christians and Muslims, and some personality constructs known to correlate with ethnocentrism (i.e., right-wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, impression management, religious fundamentalism, intrinsic-extrinsic-quest religious orientations). Consistent with social identity theory, participants' self-reported attitudes toward Christians were more positive than their self-reported attitudes toward Muslims. Participants also displayed moderate implicit preference for Christians relative to Muslims. This IAT effect could also be interpreted as implicit prejudice toward Muslims relative to Christians. A slight positive correlation between implicit and explicit attitudes was found. As self-reported anti-Arab racism, social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism, and religious fundamentalism increased, self-reported attitudes toward Muslims became more negative. The same personality variables were associated with more positive attitudes toward Christians relative to Muslims on the self-report level, but not the implicit level.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-5906.2005.00263.x

Affiliations: 1: Wade C. Rowatt is Associate Professor in Psychology and Neuroscience at Baylor University, One Bear Place #97334, Waco, TX 76798., Email: Wade_Rowatt@Baylor.edu 2: Lewis Franklin is a candidate for the Master of Divinity Degree at George W. Truett Theological Seminary, Baylor University., Email: lewis@franklin.org 3: Marla Cotton was an undergraduate psychology major at Baylor University., Email: marla_cotton@yahoo.com

Publication date: March 1, 2005

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