If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Exchange rate regimes and inflation: only hard pegs make a difference

$48.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Download / Buy Article:

Abstract:

Abstract.  Using data from a large sample of developing countries from 1985 to 2001, we confirm that hard pegs (currency boards or a shared currency) reduce inflation and money growth. There is no evidence that soft pegs confer any monetary discipline, after other factors are controlled for. Inflation triggers regime switches. Under hard pegs, monetary growth is unaffected by fiscal deficits or by inflation shocks. Under soft pegs, as under floats, increased fiscal deficits and positive inflation shocks are associated with higher monetary growth. The apparently slower per capita output growth under hard pegs is explained by their geographical distribution. JEL classification: F41

French
Régimes de taux de change et inflation: seuls des taux «fortement» chevillés font une différence. 

A partir de données pour un vaste échantillon de pays en développement entre 1985 et 2001, on confirme que des taux de change «fortement» chevillés (caisse d’émission ou devise partagée) réduisent l’inflation et la croissance monétaire. Il n’y a pas de support pour la proposition que des arrangements plus «mous» entraînent une discipline monétaire, après qu’on a pris en compte les autres facteurs. L’inflation déclenche des changements de régimes. Quand les arrangements sont «musclés», la croissance monétaire n’est pas affectée par les déficits fiscaux et les chocs inflationnistes. Quand les arrangements sont «mous», comme en régime de taux flottants, des déficits fiscaux accrus et des chocs inflationnistes positifs sont associés à une plus forte croissance monétaire. La croissance plus lente de la production per capita en régimes fortement chevillés est attribuable à la répartition géographique des pays.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0008-4085.2005.00332.x

Affiliations: 1: School of Economics, University of Nottingham 2: University of Minho

Publication date: November 1, 2005

Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more