A tale of two scenes: civic capital and retaining musical talent in Toronto and Halifax

Authors: HRACS, BRIAN J.1; GRANT, JILL L.2; HAGGETT, JEFFRY3; MORTON, JESSE2

Source: The Canadian Geographer, Volume 55, Number 3, 1 September 2011 , pp. 365-382(18)

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

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Abstract:

Although Toronto has been the centre of the Canadian music industry for many decades, recent interviews reveal that industrial restructuring may be affecting the choices that musicians make about where to live and work. In an era of contemporary independent music production, some smaller city‐regions, such as Halifax, Nova Scotia, are becoming more attractive to musicians. This article explores the ways in which musicians consider the economic and social dynamics of city‐regions in making their location choices. Musicians recognize Toronto's advantages in size and economic opportunity, yet those in the music scene described it as an intensely competitive and difficult work environment. By contrast, respondents in Halifax talked about a supportive and collaborative community that welcomed newcomers, encouraged performance, and facilitated creativity. In the contemporary context, where independent musicians are adopting new strategies to pursue their vocation, communities high in civic capital may gain an advantage in attracting and retaining talent.

Language: Spanish

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1541-0064.2011.00364.x

Affiliations: 1: Martin Prosperity Institute, University of Toronto 2: School of Planning, Dalhousie University 3: Planning and Development Department, Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, Alberta

Publication date: September 1, 2011

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