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D. Alan Shewmon has advanced a well‐documented challenge to the widely accepted total brain death criterion for death of the human being. We show that Shewmon's argument against this criterion is unsound, though he does refute the standard argument for that criterion. We advance a distinct argument for the total brain death criterion and answer likely objections. Since human beings are rational animals – sentient organisms of a specific type – the loss of the radical capacity for sentience (the capacity to sense or to develop the capacity to sense) involves a substantial change, the passing away of the human organism. In human beings total brain death involves the complete loss of the radical capacity for sentience, and so in human beings total brain death is death.
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Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Institute of Bioethics at Franciscan University of Steubenville 2: Mount Saint Mary's University, Emmitsburg, Maryland

Publication date: 2012-06-01

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