Protracted abstinence from distinct drugs of abuse shows regulation of a common gene network

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Abstract:

ABSTRACT

Addiction is a chronic brain disorder. Prolonged abstinence from drugs of abuse involves dysphoria, high stress responsiveness and craving. The neurobiology of drug abstinence, however, is poorly understood. We previously identified a unique set of hundred mu‐opioid receptor‐dependent genes in the extended amygdala, a key site for hedonic and stress processing in the brain. Here we examined these candidate genes either immediately after chronic morphine, nicotine, Δ9‐tetrahydrocannabinol or alcohol, or following 4 weeks of abstinence. Regulation patterns strongly differed among chronic groups. In contrast, gene regulations strikingly converged in the abstinent groups and revealed unforeseen common adaptations within a novel huntingtin‐centered molecular network previously unreported in addiction research. This study demonstrates that, regardless the drug, a specific set of transcriptional regulations develops in the abstinent brain, which possibly contributes to the negative affect characterizing protracted abstinence. This transcriptional signature may represent a hallmark of drug abstinence and a unitary adaptive molecular mechanism in substance abuse disorders.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1369-1600.2011.00365.x

Affiliations: IGBMC (Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire), INSERM and CNRS, Illkirch-Graffenstaden, France and UdS (Université de Strasbourg), Strasbourg, France

Publication date: January 1, 2012

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