Camus versus Sartre: The Unresolved Conflict

Author: Aronson, Ronald

Source: Sartre Studies International, Volume 11, Numbers 1-2, Spring 2005 , pp. 302-310(9)

Publisher: Berghahn Journals

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Abstract:

By what incredible foresight did the most significant intellectual quarrel of the twentieth century anticipate the major issue of the twenty-first? When Camus and Sartre parted ways in 1952, the main question dividing them was political violence—specifically, that of communism. And as they continued to jibe at each other during the next decade, especially during the war in Algeria, one of the major issues between them became terrorism. The 1957 and 1964 Nobel Laureates were divided sharply over which violence most urgently demanded to be addressed and attacked—the humiliations and oppressions, often masked, that Sartre described as systematically built into daily life under capitalism and colonialism, or the brutal and abstract calculus of murder seen by Camus as built into some of the movements that claimed to liberate people from capitalist and colonial oppression.

The Sartre-Camus conflict remains, fifty years later, philosophically unresolved. And I would argue—against today's conventional wisdom so persistently asserted by Tony Judt—it is also historically unresolved, despite today.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3167/135715505780282461

Publication date: March 1, 2005

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