Skip to main content

The French of England: the Compileison, Ancrene Wisse, and the idea of Anglo-Norman

Buy Article:

$32.95 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Or sign up for a free trial

Abstract:

This article considers the place of Anglo-Norman in nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholarship as caught between two academic solitudes: that of a France mainly interested in a few works that could be assigned high cultural prestige as part of the canon of medieval French literature; and that of an England for the most part concerned to ignore or denigrate Anglo-Norman writing in favour of the (for much of the high Middle Ages more exiguous) tradition of writings in Middle English. As a test case of the benefit of moving beyond nationalizing narratives, the article uses a thirteenth-century Anglo-Norman Compileison. This work is intimately related to an early Middle English guide for recluses, Ancrene Wisse, which played a prominent role in J. R. R. Tolkien's construction of the history of English. The Compileison emerges as a sophisticated rethinking of Ancrene Wisse with the capacity to upset many of our standard notions of the role of Anglo-Norman in early English culture and of the significance of the French of England in the literatures and languages of 'Romania'.

Keywords: ANGLO-NORMAN; COMPILATION; HISTORY OF SCHOLARSHIP (FRENCH AND ENGLISH); MEDIEVAL SELFHOODS; PASTORAL THEOLOGY; PENANCE; SPIRITUALITY; VERNACULARITY

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3167/147335304782106619

Publication date: December 1, 2004

More about this publication?
berghahn/romance/2004/00000004/00000003/art00003
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
UA-1313315-19
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more