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Translating Economics into Politics in Cold War Germany

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Abstract:

Economics and economic history have a fundamental role to play in our understanding of Cold War Germany. Yet, it is still difficult to establish concrete links between economic phenomena and the most important questions facing post 1945 historians. Obviously, one may evaluate West Germany's “economic miracle,” the success of western European integration, or the end of communism in 1989 from a purely economic point of view. To achieve a deeper understanding of Cold War Germany, however, one must evaluate whether the social market economy represented an adequate response to Nazism, if memory and perspective provided the decisive impulse for European integration, or if the Cold War ended in Europe because of changes in western nuclear strategy. Economic history operates in relation to politics, culture, and historical memory. The parameters for economic action are often as determined by the given political culture of the moment, as they are by the feasibility of alternative economic philosophies.

Keywords: COMMON AGRICULTURAL POLICY (CAP); EUROPEAN ECONOMIC COMMUNITY (EEC); LUDWIG ERHARD; NEOLIBERALISM; SOCIAL MARKET ECONOMY; SOCIALIST UNITY PARTY (SED)

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3167/gps.2007.250207

Publication date: June 1, 2007

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