Negotiating Popular Obesity Discourses in Adolescence: School Food, Personal Responsibility, and Gendered Food Consumption Behaviors

The full text article is temporarily unavailable.

We apologise for the inconvenience. Please try again later.

Abstract:

Ethnographic research, including individual interviews, focus groups and participant observation, was conducted to explore youth perceptions of school food, attitudes about overweight and obesity, and gendered food consumption behaviors within the broader context of competing popular discourses about the national "obesity epidemic." Adolescents interviewed harshly criticized overweight people for a perceived lack of self-control; at the same time, youth reported feeling out of control with regard to their own food consumption behaviors at school. As a result, girls blamed themselves for eating "junk food" at school and engaged in "guilt talk" to mitigate feelings of guilt and display personal responsibility. Girls also shared junk food items with friends to limit the amount consumed. In contrast, boys did not express feeling guilty about eating junk food and reported trading or jacking (slang term meaning "to steal") junk food items from friends as opposed to sharing, a behavior that was associated only with girls.

Keywords: ADOLESCENCE; DIETING; GENDER; HIGH SCHOOL; OBESITY; PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY; SCHOOL FOOD ENVIRONMENT

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2752/175174411X13046092851433

Publication date: December 1, 2011

Related content

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more