A Taste of Army Life: Food, Identity and the Rankers of the First World War

The full text article is temporarily unavailable.

We apologise for the inconvenience. Please try again later.

Abstract:

Food and military identity were inextricably linked in the British Army: rations were a thrice daily indicator of the men's separation from their civilian selves. The soldiers were what they ate, but they were also where and how they ate; the grubby rapacity of the barrack dining hall, the absence of civilizing cutlery and the unfamiliar food delineated their new role as clearly as any uniform. Institutional feeding facilitated the erasure of self, an unhelpful attribute in the military world. Men's accounts indicate the conflict between their appetites and what they all too often regarded as oppression in a dietary form.

Keywords: ARMY PROVISIONING; FIRST WORLD WAR; FOOD; IDENTITY; RITES OF PASSAGE

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2752/147800412X13270753068885

Affiliations: History Department, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex, CO4 3SQ, UK;, Email: rduffe@essex.ac.uk

Publication date: June 1, 2012

Related content

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more