'Dark Corners of the Land'?

A New Approach to Regional Factors in the Civil Wars of England and Wales

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Abstract:

An ongoing struggle to discern patterns of allegiance in the Civil Wars has emerged as a geographic enterprise, whose constructions of England's 'wild' West in particular need careful re-evaluation. 'Dark Corners' examines the major twentieth-century theories of an East/West divide within England – in relationship to one another, to modern quantitative geography's various models of civil war in general, and to seventeenth-century geographical writing and cartography. It goes on to suggest a new study of regional patterning of active royalism vis-a-vis the education, educational activities, regional origins and migration patterns of the clergy of the Church of England, who are perhaps as unique in their susceptibility to geographical analysis as in their role in the public communication of ideas.

Keywords: CLERGY; EDUCATION; HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY; POPULAR ROYALISM; SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLAND AND WALES

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2752/147800410X12634795054577

Affiliations: Department of History, King's College, Old Aberdeen, AB24 3FX;, Email: d.s.maccannell@abdn.ac.uk

Publication date: June 1, 2010

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