Fanconi-Bickel Syndrome - A Congenital Defect of Facilitative Glucose Transport

$63.10 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

Fanconi-Bickel syndrome (FBS, OMIM 227810) is a rare type of glycogen storage disease (GSD). It is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations within GLUT2, the gene encoding the most important facilitative glucose transporter in hepatocytes, pancreatic b-cells, enterocytes, and renal tubular cells. To date, 112 patients have been reported in the literature. Most patients have the typical combination of clinical symptoms: hepatomegaly secondary to glycogen accumulation, glucose and galactose intolerance, fasting hypoglycemia, a characteristic tubular nephropathy, and severely stunted growth. In 63 patients, mutation analysis has revealed a total of 34 different GLUT2 mutations with none of them being particularly frequent. No specific therapy is available for FBS patients. Symptomatic treatment is directed towards a stabilization of glucose homeostasis and compensation for renal losses of various solutes. In addition to the clinical and molecular genetic aspects of FBS, this review discusses the pathophysiology of the disease and compares it to recent findings in GLUT2 deficient transgenic animals. An overview is also provided on recently discovered members of the rapidly growing family of facilitative glucose transporters, which are novel candidates for congenital disorders of carbohydrate metabolism.
More about this publication?
  • Current Molecular Medicine is an interdisciplinary journal focused on providing the readership with current and comprehensive reviews on fundamental molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, the development of molecular-diagnosis and/or novel approaches to rational treatment. The reviews should be of significant interest to basic researchers and clinical investigators in molecular medicine. Periodically the journal will invite guest editors to devote an issue on a basic research area that shows promise to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanism(s) of a disease or has potential for clinical applications.
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more