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Alzheimer´s Disease and Oxidative Stress: A Review

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Alzheimer´s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with no known cure and rapid rise in incidence. The predominant cognitive impairment is currently treated using cognitive enhancers like cholinesterase inhibitors. The two molecular hallmarks of AD are amyloid plaques created from an amyloid precursor protein and hyperphosphorylated tau protein that is deposited as neurofibrillary tangles inside neurons. A number of pathological mechanisms follow or precede these formations. Alteration in mitochondrial function and deposition of heavy metals are reported. The disease progression is enhanced by oxidative stress. However, the role of oxidative stress is not universally accepted. The current review covers and discusses the basic evidence and role of oxidative stress in AD development.
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Keywords: Alzheimer disease; Fenton reaction; amyloid plaque; antioxidants; heavy metals; mitochondria; parkinson´s disease; reactive oxygen species; tau

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 2014-01-01

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  • Current Medicinal Chemistry covers all the latest and outstanding developments in medicinal chemistry and rational drug design. Each issue contains a series of timely in-depth reviews written by leaders in the field covering a range of the current topics in medicinal chemistry. Current Medicinal Chemistry is an essential journal for every medicinal chemist who wishes to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments.
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