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Folate and Homocysteine Metabolism: Therapeutic Targets in Cardiovascular and Neurodegenerative Disorders

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Abstract:

Individuals with elevated homocysteine levels are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke, and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases Homocysteine is a modified form of the amino acid methionine that is tightly regulated by enzymes requiring folate. By impairing DNA repair mechanisms and inducing oxidative stress, homocysteine can cause the dysfunction or death of cells in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Dietary folate stimulates homocysteine removal and may thereby protect cells against disease processes. The enzymes involved in homocysteine and folate metabolism provide novel targets for drug discovery.

Keywords: apoptosis; atherosclerosis; dietary folic acid; schizophrenia; stem cells

Document Type: Review Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.2174/0929867033456864

Affiliations: Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Gerontology Research Center, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA.

Publication date: 2003-10-01

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  • Current Medicinal Chemistry covers all the latest and outstanding developments in medicinal chemistry and rational drug design. Each issue contains a series of timely in-depth reviews written by leaders in the field covering a range of the current topics in medicinal chemistry. Current Medicinal Chemistry is an essential journal for every medicinal chemist who wishes to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments.
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