Development and Application of Bioprobes for Mammalian Cell Cycle Analyses

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Abstract:



In this review, I have mainly described the cell cycle inhibitors isolated from microbial metabolites. Once the molecular target of the inhibitor is determined, the inhibitor can be used as bioprobe to dissect the diverse aspect of biological functions in chemical biology research. Reveromycin A and phosmidosine inhibited the protein synthesis of mammalian cells and arrested the cell cycle at G1 phase. Lucilactaene arrested cells at G1 phase through restoration of mutant p53. Tryprostatin A inhibited the microtubule polymerization by interfering with the interaction between tubulin and microtubule associating protein. On the contrary, cyclotryprostatin D, structurally related to tryprostatin A, enhanced the tubulin polymerization. Terpendole E inhibited the motor activity of mitotic kinesin, Eg5 and induced monoastral spindle in M phase.





Keywords: Ilers; chemical biology; cyclin-dependent kinase; kinesin; mitosis; p53; tubulin

Document Type: Review Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/0929867033457836

Publication date: May 1, 2003

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  • Current Medicinal Chemistry covers all the latest and outstanding developments in medicinal chemistry and rational drug design. Each issue contains a series of timely in-depth reviews written by leaders in the field covering a range of the current topics in medicinal chemistry. Current Medicinal Chemistry is an essential journal for every medicinal chemist who wishes to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments.
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