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Use of Nanoparticles as Therapy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

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Abstract:

Staphylococcal infection can cause a wide range of diseases resulting either from staphylococcal bacteria invasion or through toxin production. The majority of infections caused by staphylococci are due to Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has recently been considered to be one of the major causes of hospital-acquired infections. The treatment of staphylococci infections is difficult because increased antibiotic resistant strains have become more common, increasing the risk of serious health penalty. Delivery of antibiotics via nanoparticles is a promising therapy, as a drug delivery mechanism, particularly for controlled release or depot delivery of drugs to decrease the number of doses required to achieve a clinical effect. This review emphasized the potential of nanoparticles in the targeted antibiotics for therapy of staphylococcal infections.





Keywords: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcal infections; Staphylococcus aureus; antibiotic therapy; nanoparticles

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.2174/138920009790274522

Publication date: 2009-10-01

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  • Current Drug Metabolism aims to cover all the latest and outstanding developments in drug metabolism and disposition. The journal serves as an international forum for the publication of timely reviews in drug metabolism. Current Drug Metabolism is an essential journal for academic, clinical, government and pharmaceutical scientists who wish to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments. The journal covers the following areas:

    In vitro systems including CYP-450; enzyme induction and inhibition; drug-drug interactions and enzyme kinetics; pharmacokinetics, toxicokinetics, species scaling and extrapolations; P-glycoprotein and transport carriers; target organ toxicity and interindividual variability; drug metabolism and disposition studies; extrahepatic metabolism; phase I and phase II metabolism; recent developments for the identification of drug metabolites and adducts.
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