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Oxidative Stress Signaling in Alzheimer's Disease

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Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that oxidative stress is an early event in Alzheimer's disease (AD), occurring prior to cytopathology, and therefore may play a key pathogenic role in AD. Oxidative stress not only temporally precedes the pathological lesions of the disease but also activates cell signaling pathways, which, in turn, contribute to lesion formation and, at the same time, provoke cellular responses such as compensatory upregulation of antioxidant enzymes found in vulnerable neurons in AD. In this review, we provide an overview of the evidence of oxidative stress and compensatory responses that occur in AD, particularly focused on potential sources of oxidative stress and the roles and mechanism of activation of stress-activated protein kinase pathways.





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Keywords: Alzheimer disease; JNK pathway; compensation; oxidative stress; signal transduction

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 01 December 2008

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  • Current Alzheimer Research publishes peer-reviewed frontier review and research articles on all areas of Alzheimer's disease. This multidisciplinary journal will help in understanding the neurobiology, genetics, pathogenesis, and treatment strategies of Alzheimer's disease. The journal publishes objective reviews written by experts and leaders actively engaged in research using cellular, molecular, and animal models. The journal also covers original articles on recent research in fast emerging areas of molecular diagnostics, brain imaging, drug development and discovery, and clinical aspects of Alzheimer's disease. Manuscripts are encouraged that relate to the synergistic mechanism of Alzheimer's disease with other dementia and neurodegenerative disorders. Book reviews, meeting reports and letters-to-the-editor are also published. The journal is essential reading for researchers, educators and physicians with interest in age-related dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Current Alzheimer Research provides a comprehensive 'bird's-eye view' of the current state of Alzheimer's research for neuroscientists, clinicians, health science planners, granting, caregivers and families of this devastating disease.
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