Effects of amplitude compression on first- and second-order modulation detection thresholds in cochlear implant listeners

Authors: Lorenzi, Christian1; Sibellas, Jérome1; Füllgrabe, Christian2; Gallégo, Stéphane3; Fugain, Claude1; Meyer, Bernard1

Source: International Journal of Audiology, Volume 43, Number 5, Number 5/May 2004 , pp. 264-270(7)

Publisher: Informa Healthcare

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Abstract:

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of instantaneous non-linear amplitude mapping on the detection of single-component and multicomponent temporal envelopes. To address this issue, first- and secondorder amplitude modulation detection thresholds were measured in four cochlear implant users with the intervention of the compression device of the implant processor. The compression device is set to produce either a strongly or a weakly logarithmic mapping of stimulus amplitude to electrical amplitude. ‘First-order' modulation detection thresholds indicate the ability of listeners to detect sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM) applied to a white noise carrier; they are measured as a function of the rate of that modulation, f m . ‘Second-order' modulation detection thresholds indicate the ability to detect sinusoidal modulation applied to the depth of a sinusoidally amplitude-modulated signal (here, a 16-Hz sinusoidally amplitude-modulated white noise); they are measured as a function of the rate of the modulation applied to the modulation depth (referred to as f m '). In each task, stimuli are transformed by the implant processor and are presented through one electrode at approximately the same level. The results show that, in cochlear implant listeners, both first- and second-order modulation detection thresholds measured at the lower rates (≤7 Hz) decrease slightly by about 3–6 dB when the stronger compression is used. No effect of compression is observed at higher rates. These results suggest that instantaneous logarithmic amplitude mapping has beneficial— but limited—effects on the detection of single-component and multicomponent temporal envelopes. These results are discussed in light of current models of temporal envelope processing.

Keywords: Cochlear implant; Compression; Second-order modulation; Temporal envelope

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14992020400050035

Affiliations: 1: Laboratoire de Recherche ORL, Hôpital St Antoine, CHU St Antoine, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Paris, France 2: Equipe Perception Auditive, Laboratoire de Psychologie Expérimentale, UMR CNRS 8581, UFR Institut de Psychologie, Université René Descartes Paris 5, Boulogne-Billancourt, Paris, France 3: Laboratoire MXM, Vallauris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Paris, France

Publication date: May 1, 2004

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