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Sex Differences in Pediatric Dental Pain Perception

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Purpose: To evaluate sex-related differences in dental pain perception in children.

Methods: Fifty-two children who received a dental procedure with local anesthesia were selected to participate. Pain perception levels were assessed with the Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale. Twenty-four and 48 hours following the procedure, the parents were contacted by phone for a verbal survey to assess their child's postoperative pain. Age, type of dental procedure, and behavior were also evaluated as covariables. The data were analyzed using Epi Info 7.0 software and GraphPad Prism 5.0 software. Chi-square or t test were performed with a significance level of five percent.

Results: The mean age of the children was 6.7 (±2.4 [SD]) years. Twenty-seven (51.9 percent) were boys. None of the parents reported pain at 48 hours. None of the covariables were differentially distributed among the sexes (P>0.05). There was no statistical difference between sex and pain perception immediately after the procedure (P=0.64) and after 24 hours (P=0.41). However, when the analysis was performed according to age group, a borderline association was found. Female preschoolers reported more pain immediately after the procedure than male preschoolers (P=0.06).

Conclusion: There was no statistical difference in pain perception between sexes.
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Keywords: CHILD; PAIN; PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY; SEX

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Dental student, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. 2: Graduate student, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. 3: Associate professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. 4: Professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. 5: Research Fellow, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil;, Email: [email protected]

Publication date: 2016-09-01

More about this publication?
  • Acquired after the merger between the American Society of Dentistry for Children and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry in 2002, the Journal of Dentistry for Children (JDC) is an internationally renowned journal whose publishing dates back to 1934. Published three times a year, JDC promotes the practice, education and research specifically related to the specialty of pediatric dentistry. It covers a wide range of topics related to the clinical care of children, from clinical techniques of daily importance to the practitioner, to studies on child behavior and growth and development. JDC also provides information on the physical, psychological and emotional conditions of children as they relate to and affect their dental health.
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