Open Access Spontaneous Gastric Carcinomas in Sooty Mangabeys (Cercocebus atys)

 Download
(PDF 290.6kb)
 
Download Article:

Abstract:

Sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) are native to West Africa and are a natural host of SIV, which is implicated in the origin of HIV2. They have been used in studies of AIDS pathogenesis, leprosy, immune responses, reproductive biology, and behavior. Spontaneous tumors have rarely been reported in this species. However, we noted spontaneous gastric carcinomas in 8 sooty mangabeys. Four male and 4 female mangabeys had mild to severe chronic weight loss, with abdominal distention in 5 of 8 animals. At necropsy, 7 of the 8 mangabeys had prominent large ulcerated masses with severe, diffuse thickening of the pyloric wall at or near the gastric–duodenal junction, which often partially occluded the gastric lumen. Early carcinoma was an incidental finding in one mangabey. Histologically, all of the tumors were classified as adenocarcinomas. Adenocarcinomas were noncircumscribed with infiltrates of neoplastic epithelial cells, often arranged in acini. In 3 mangabeys, these infiltrates were transmural and invaded surrounding tissue locally. The adenocarcinomas were locally invasive, with metastasis to regional lymph nodes in 2 animals, but widespread metastasis was not seen. Anisocytosis, anisokaryosis, and high mitotic rates were seen in all 8 tumors. In the samples available, serology and Steiner stain did not detect Helicobacter, and immunohistochemistry failed to reveal Helicobacter or Epstein–Barr virus, 2 potential causes for human gastric carcinomas.

Document Type: Case Report

Affiliations: 1: Division of Pathology, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. psharm9@emory.edu 2: Division of Animal Resources, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Division of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 3: Division of Animal Resources, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Division of Scientific Resources, NCEZID, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 4: Division of Pathology, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 5: Division of Cognitive and Developmental Neuroscience, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Publication date: December 1, 2011

More about this publication?
  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

    Attention Members: To access the full text of the articles, be sure you are logged in to the AALAS website.

    Attention: please note, due to a temporary technical problem, reference linking within the content is not available at this time
  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Membership Information
  • Information for Advertisers
  • For issues prior to 1998
  • Institutional Subscription Activation
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more