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Open Access Comparison of Various Anthelmintic Therapies for the Treatment of Trypanoxyuris microon Infection in Owl Monkeys (Aotus nancymae)

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Abstract:

Trypanoxyuris microon is a pinworm that infects New World nonhuman primates, including Aotus nancymae. Although it typically is clinically insignificant, infection may serve as a significant variable during experimental data analysis. In this study we sought to determine the most effective anthelmintic therapy for eradication of T. microon infection in A. nancymae. Animals confirmed to be infected with T. microon by perianal tape test were treated twice (on days 0 and 14) with pyrantel pamoate, ivermectin, or thiabendazole and evaluated for eggs by daily perianal tape test throughout the entire 28-d period. Successful clearance of eggs was defined as 5 consecutive negative perianal tape tests. Pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin were significantly more effective at egg clearance than were thiabendazole and no treatment. Overall, 100% of the pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin treatment groups were cleared of infection after 2 treatments, whereas only 60% of the thiabendazole group became negative for pinworm eggs. In addition, the time after treatment until clearance was 1 to 2 d for pyrantel pamoate, 2 to 4 d for thiabendazole, and 4 to 6.5 d for ivermectin. These results indicate that pyrantel pamoate was the most effective and rapidly acting anthelmintic for the treatment of adult T. microon infection, with ivermectin as a suitable alternative. However because of the potential for continued development of immature stages or reinfection, anthelmintic doses should be repeated after 1 to 2 wk, in combination with effective environmental sanitation.

Document Type: Miscellaneous

Publication date: April 1, 2007

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  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

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