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Open Access Adaptation of Plasmodium Vivax to Growth in Owl Monkeys (Aotus nancymai)

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Abstract:

The purpose of this study was reactivation and adaptation of a strain of Plasmodium vivax to Aotus nancymai monkeys. A need arose for malarial parasites for use in serologic and molecular studies and for teaching slides. This particular strain of parasite had been characterized previously as producing high-density parasitemia in splenectomized New World monkeys and therefore represented a good candidate for reactivation. P. vivax (Vietnam II), isolated in 1970, was reactivated after adaptation in Aotus lemurinus griseimembra monkeys nearly 33 years earlier and adapted to A. nancymai monkeys. Passage was achieved by intravenous inoculation of parasite blood stages into splenectomized A. nancymai monkeys. Parasitemia was determined by analyzing daily blood smears stained with Giemsa. Maximum parasite counts ranged from 10,630 to 94,000 parasites/l; the mean maximum parasite count for the four animals was 39,565 parasites/l. Parasite counts of > 10,000/l were maintained for 2 to 64 days. After only three passages of the parasite, attempts to reactive were successful. A. nancymai proved a suitable animal model for the recovery of this parasite. In conclusion, successful reactivation and adaptation of this parasite offers the capability to perform a series of diagnostic, immunologic, and molecular studies as well as to provide otherwise potentially unavailable teaching materials to healthcare professionals.

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Animal Resources Branch, Scientific Resources Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, 4770 Buford Highway MSF33, Building 15 Chamblee, Georgia 2: Animal Resources Branch, Scientific Resources Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 3: Office of Biodefense Research Affairs, Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland 4: Division of Parasitic Diseases, Malaria Branch, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, Georgia

Publication date: 2005-12-01

More about this publication?
  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

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