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Open Access Behavioral and Clinical Pathology Changes in Koi Carp (Cyprinus carpio) Subjected to Anesthesia and Surgery with and without Intra-Operative Analgesics

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Abstract:

Fish surgery is becoming increasingly common in laboratory and clinical settings. Behavioral and physiologic consequences of surgical procedures may affect experimental results, so these effects should be defined and, if possible, ameliorated. We document behavioral and clinical pathology changes in koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) undergoing surgery with tricaine methanesulphonate (MS-222) anesthesia, with and without intraoperative administration of the opiate butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg intramuscularly) or the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory analgesic ketoprofen (2 mg/kg intramuscularly). For all fish combined, surgery resulted in reduced activity, lower position in the water column, and decreased feeding intensity at multiple time points after surgery. The butorphanol-treated group was the only one not to experience significant (P < 0.05) alterations from presurgical behaviors. Clinical pathology changes at 48 h after anesthesia and surgery included decreased hematocrit, total solids, phosphorus, total protein, albumin, globulin, potassium, and chloride and increased plasma glucose, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and bicarbonate. The only clinical pathology difference between treatment groups was a lower increase in creatine kinase in the ketoprofen-treated group. No adverse effects of butorphanol or ketoprofen at these doses were identified. These results suggest a mild behavioral sparing effect of butorphanol and reduced muscle damage from the antiinflammatory activity of ketoprofen.

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Environmental Medicine Consortium, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27606 2: Environmental Medicine Consortium, Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27606 3: Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27606, 741 Victorian Place, Fayetteville, North Carolina 28301 4: Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27606

Publication date: June 1, 2005

More about this publication?
  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

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